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Marilyn Monroe Style: If you’ve got it, flaunt it

Marilyn Monroe Style: If you’ve got it, flaunt it

Marilyn Monroe Style: If you’ve got it, flaunt it


Glammed up in a pink strapless satin gown in How to Marry a Millionaire, or in a simple cable knit sweater and tights in Let’s Make Love Marilyn Monroe’s style teaches us two lessons: play to your strengths and tailor everything.


Play to your strengths.

She wasn’t the original hourglass movie star, but undoubtedly has one of the most famous figures in Hollywood history.  Everything she wore, from pencil skirts, wiggle dresses and tight knit tops played to her best assets — her curves.  


One of the sexiest stars of our time, but her clothing was often subtly sexy rather than overtly sexy.  The sweetheart necklines were low, but her cleavage wasn’t the focal point of the outfit. It was always her figure.  Today most of us dress to hide what we don’t like about our body. Marilyn never hid her curves.  


She also frequently wore boatneck knit tops to show off her neckline and collarbone.  

Instead of obsessing over what’s wrong with your figure, what’s too big or soft — shift your perspective and focus on showing off your best features.


Tailor everything.

Whether she was wearing khaki capris in her off time, or the flesh colored rhinestone encrusted dress for President John F. Kennedy’s birthday in 1962 that she was supposedly sewn into, her clothes fit precisely in order to show off her curves.  


When you tailor your clothes to fit your body, not the fit model clothing companies use, you can’t help but play to your strengths.  In our instant gratification world we want to find a clothing brand that we can buy off the rack and wear that night. Sometimes we find a brand that comes close, but people forget that a good tailor can make a good dress great and a great dress spectacular.  


When most people think of Marilyn Monroe, they think of the ultra glam, sexy movie star — they rarely think of her clothes and personal style.  By tailoring everything and always playing to her strengths, her wardrobe did exactly what it should — it put the focus on the woman and not the clothes.